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It’s 8 March, International Women’s Day, and there’s a lot on! To quote from the events page of the official website, ‘Each year on 8 March, hundreds of International Women’s Day events occur all around the world. They events range from small random informal gatherings to large-scale highly organised events. All celebrate women’s advancement and highlght the need for continued vigilance and action. IWD is a major day of global celebration for the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future.’

  • The UN has a timeline.
  • Here’s a twitter feed written by Reuters editors with IWD news from around the world.
  • Here’s a short history from the India Times.
  • Here’s a comprehensive, Australia-focussed one by Joyce Stevens. It’s well worth a look.

Here in NSW (via SMH):

MP Lee Rhiannon will use today’s International Women’s Day to launch a campaign calling for NSW to follow the lead of Victoria and the ACT by including abortion in health legislation, not the criminal law.

The NSW Crimes Act provides up to 10 years’ jail for abortion but a common law ruling in 1971 allows the procedure if a doctor believes the pregnancy would result in serious danger to the woman’s physical or mental health.

Also, a somewhat problematic article:

More than 400 high-profile women, including two heads of state, pressed for equal rights for half the world’s population as they gathered in Liberia on Saturday on the eve of International Women’s Day.

I’m not linking to The Age because their coverage makes me want to pull the covers back over my head.

The AP has UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on violence against women.

A year after he launched a global campaign to end such violence, the U.N. chief used the U.N.’s International Women’s Day commemorations to report on the abuses — rape, attempted rape and beatings — that flourish worldwide.

News,com.au reports on a very sad survey of young women in South Australia. Their top concerns were violence, self-image and gender role stereotypes. There’s a lot more in there.

What are you doing today?